The Surprising Reason the Oculus Quest Could Make VR Mainstream

The Surprising Reason the Oculus Quest Could Make VR Mainstream

Over the last several months, hype has grown for the Oculus Quest among virtual reality enthusiasts and developers. Facebook's latest play on consumer VR seems promising, but will it have what it takes to drive the industry beyond B2B applications and the gaming niche? Find out in this article.

It's no secret that one of the main things holding back consumer VR is convenience. Having to fire up a computer and troubleshoot controllers has its downsides. Of course, those are issues that can come with the Oculus Rift, the HTC Vive, and other tethered VR solutions. With the Oculus Quest, people will be able to put on a headset, hit the power button, and launch into an immersive 6 DoF experience. One that is far superior to the stripped back, Oculus Go.

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The question is: will the ease of use be enough to entice casual users outside of the gaming niche?

Philip Rosedale, founder of Second Life, and more recently, High Fidelity VR, seems to think so. In a presentation he gave to students at Peabody Institute Of The Johns Hopkins University, he noted many of the Quest’s impressive features—including room capture. The feat of computer science will help users who are walking around within an experience see boundaries in the real world.

But the high tech breakthroughs aren’t what will make the Oculus Quest a mainstream breakthrough, according to Philip…

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The founder of the $600 million dollar Second Life economy thinks it will be something far simpler. Instead, people will likely flock to the Quest because they can check their email on it, scroll through social media content, or watch movies on a simulated big screen television (without actually having a big screen television).

We agree with Mr Rosedale. The fancy stuff is great, but at the end of the day, people care about ease of use and cost savings. The Quest allows you to watch TV, accomplish day-to-day computer tasks, and find new forms of entertainment—all in one device. There are significant cost savings to that. You don't have to buy a TV, a computer, and a phone (PLUS whatever other accessories that come with them).

That’s also the prediction of SuperData Research, which recently released a XR Market Update. According to their research, 2019 is going to be a critical year for the VR industry. Luckily, VR had strong momentum at the end of 2018. Most importantly, they concluded there is a good chance the standalone headset will sell 3x more units than the PC-tethered Rift this year.

All in all, between the Oculus Quest, and it's Vive counterpart, the Focus, 2019 is poised to be the year that VR starts making a dent in mainstream entertainment.

Do you think 2019 is the year of VR? Let us know in the comments.

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